Fragmentation drives 3-way split at TOP 10 Holiday Parks

The new classes have been accompanied by a new assessment model. Credit: Top 10 Holiday Parks

A fragmenting tourist market and increased complexity has driven a three-way branding split of TOP 10 Holiday Parks.

The holiday park operator has split its 47 operations into “Premium”, “Superior” and “Classic” classes as it positions itself to cater for a wider variety of travellers.

David Ovendale

“The market is getting more and more fragmented and there are more international tourists and more domestic tourists bringing a broader range of needs, wants and expectations,” said TOP 10 chief executive David Ovendale.

“We have a nationwide product that needs to be explained as clearly as possible to ensure that when people arrive on our doorsteps they get what they expect to get.”

The move follows research involving 1400 TOP 10 Holiday Park guests that showed many visitors wanted to better understand what they were getting before they arrived at a park.

“A segmentation approach offers greater clarity and helps visitors understand options on offer in each location like heated swimming pools, wifi and more amenities and facilities than your traditional holiday park offering,” said Ovendale.

Visitors had become more complex and TOP 10 saw an opportunity to diversify to address this market reality, added Ovendale.

Source: TOP 10 Holiday Parks

The new tiers would be unveiled across all of its 47 parks, including signage, the website, staff clothing and all promotional material over the next 6 months.

The rebranding has also been accompanied by a new assessment model, which was used to assign holiday parks to the three tiers.

Parks were assessed in four key areas: Qualmark ratings, reputation management, facilities and amenities requirements, and a TOP 10 member participation component.

The segmentation and rebranding project was undertaken with the help of Miles Partnership and Q Brand Agency.

TOP 10 was established in 1983 and comprises of around 10% of New Zealand’s holiday parks.

According to Holiday Accommodation Parks Association of NZ, the sector contributes around $1bn annually to the economy, split between $490m from international visitors and $578m from New Zealanders.

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